Tuesday, 2017-10-24, 4:12 AM
Welcome, Guest
[ New messages · Members · Forum rules · Search · RSS ]
Page 1 of 11
Forum moderator: RSAUB 
Forum » ..:: History ::.. » General history discussion » The BRITISH Isles
The BRITISH Isles
CulzieDate: Thursday, 2015-07-02, 8:41 PM | Message # 1
Generalissimo
Group: Administrators
Messages: 1739
Load ...
Status: Offline
Wiki says

The name "England" is derived from the Old English name Englaland, which means "land of the Angles".[11] The Angles were one of the Germanic tribes that settled in Great Britain during the Early Middle Ages. The Angles came from the Angeln peninsula in the Bay of Kiel area of the Baltic Sea.[12] According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first known use of "England" to refer to the southern part of the island of Great Britain occurs in 897, and its modern spelling was first used in 1538.[13]

The earliest attested reference to the Angles occurs in the 1st-century work by Tacitus, Germania, in which the Latin word Anglii is used.[14] The etymology of the tribal name itself is disputed by scholars; it has been suggested that it derives from the shape of the Angeln peninsula, an angular shape.[15] How and why a term derived from the name of a tribe that was less significant than others, such as the Saxons, came to be used for the entire country and its people is not known, but it seems this is related to the custom of calling the Germanic people in Britain Angli Saxones or English Saxons.[16] In Scottish Gaelic, another language which developed on the island of Great Britain, the Saxon tribe gave their name to the word for England (Sasunn);[17] similarly, the Welsh name for the English language is "Saesneg".

An alternative name for England is Albion. The name Albion originally referred to the entire island of Great Britain. The nominally earliest record of the name appears in the Aristotelian Corpus, specifically the 4th century BC De Mundo:[18]  '' Beyond the Pillars of Hercules is the ocean that flows round the earth. In it are two very large islands called Britannia, these are Albion and lerne ''.[18][19]  But modern scholar consensus ascribes De Mundo not to Aristotle but to Pseudo-Aristotle, i.e. it was written later in the Graeco-Roman period or afterwards. The word Albion (Ἀλβίων) or insula Albionum has two possible origins. It either derives from a cognate of the Latin albus meaning white, a reference to the white cliffs of Dover, the only part of Britain visible from the European Continent,[20] or from the phrase the "island of the Albiones"[21] in the now lost Massaliote Periplus, that is attested through Avienus' Ora Maritima[22] to which the former presumably served as a source. Albion is now applied to England in a more poetic capacity.[23] Another romantic name for England is Loegria, related to the Welsh word for England, Lloegr, and made popular by its use in Arthurian legend.


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
Forum » ..:: History ::.. » General history discussion » The BRITISH Isles
Page 1 of 11
Search: