Tuesday, 2017-10-24, 4:12 AM
Welcome, Guest
[ New messages · Members · Forum rules · Search · RSS ]
Page 1 of 11
Forum moderator: RSAUB 
Forum » ..:: General ::.. » General Discussion » Scottish Independence, why it is being voted on
Scottish Independence, why it is being voted on
CulzieDate: Thursday, 2014-09-04, 5:53 PM | Message # 1
Generalissimo
Group: Administrators
Messages: 1739
Load ...
Status: Offline
Good piece tracing the road to the Scottish vote on independence. It is always puzzling to me why those in power think that by conceding a bit it will undermine those pushing for a goal. It doesn't work that way, in fact the opposite happens, conceding a bit, means they seek more. Devolving power to Scotland only increased the likelihood of an independent Scotland.  A bit like the situation in Ulster when Thatcher sold out to Irish republicanism. This it was said would bolster the SDLP and stop the rise of Sinn Fein.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/special/2014/newsspec_8699/index.html


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
CulzieDate: Monday, 2014-09-15, 3:02 PM | Message # 2
Generalissimo
Group: Administrators
Messages: 1739
Load ...
Status: Offline
The Scottish independence referendum on Thursday could have ramifications for supporters of one of Scotland’s most identifiable British institutions - Glasgow Rangers Football Club, if a majority plumps to leave the Union.

A popular anthem for the legions at Ibrox Park is Rule Britannia and, proportionally, there are usually more Union Jacks displayed at a Rangers game than one might expect to see at a Royal Trooping of the Colour in London.

British soldiers in Scottish regiments are feted regularly by the Ibrox fans and the Union Jack has prominence on the roof of the famous listed red-bricked grandstand on Edmiston Drive

The Rangers Football Club has been British and true-blue Scottish and proud of it since its foundation in 1872 by a group of young Glasgow sportsmen who included Moses McNeil, whose mother came from Bellshill outside Downpatrick in Co Down.

The Ulster and Northern Ireland connections are deep-rooted at Rangers with tens of thousands of people in this part of the United Kingdom in loyal support of the famous Gers.

Rangers may be experiencing the most traumatic period in its illustrious history, being now in its third season out of the premiership ranks of Scottish football, but the club can still muster 50,000 fans for home games and wields considerable influence in the sporting and social fabric of the west of Scotland, and beyond.

Scottish National Party deputy leader Nicola Sturgeon may politically represent in the Scottish Parliament the constituency of Govan - where Rangers Football Club locate, but her influence at Ibrox Park is non-existent.

Officially, Rangers Football Club has not proferred a preference on how people should vote in next Thursday’s referendum, but a senior staffer at Ibrox Park told me he fully would agree with the assessment that the vast majority of supporters would be ‘No’ voters.

Current Rangers manager Ally McCoist and predecessor Walter Smith have nailed their colours to the mast by declaring a ‘No’ to independence. And interestingly, so too have Glasgow Celtic legends Billy McNeill, Bertie Auld and Pat Crerand and other famous footballing Scots - David Moyes, Kenny Dalglish and Alan Hansen.

Indeed, several of the Scottish Labour politicians, who are Celtic fans including MPs Jim Murphy, a former Opposition defence spokesman..

This referendum campaign for a ‘No’ vote appears to have crossed the ‘Old Firm’ sectarian divide in the west of Scotland to a large degree, a development confirmed by Daily Record soccer journalist David McCarthy.

But even in the unlikely event of a far-reaching, radical constitution-changing ‘Yes’ vote, David does not expect things will change much among supporters at Ibrox Park in attitudes in the flying of the Union Jack and the display of fervently pro-British sentiments.

"There will probably be more Union Jacks displayed at Ibrox, if there was to be an independent Scotland,," said David, whose newspaper, a Labour organ, is solidly behind the ‘No’ campaign.

At a recent Rangers game a huge banner was unfurled bearing the telling words: ‘No Thanks’. Glasgow Celtic is a Scottish-based club steeped in an Irish nationalist/Roman Catholic tradition and a great many fans who flock to Parkhead stadium look to the "auld country" for their historical and cultural identity.

If the independent vote is carried, Glasgow Rangers Football Club and true blue supporters would likely be seen, in the new constitutional and political dispensation, as showing allegiance to a foreign country.

Such a scenario would not worry the Ibrox legions who would still proclaim with "Heart and Hand" their Britishness and assertive support for the unionist and loyalist cause.

However, if would be a supreme irony for supporters of Scotland’s two biggest football clubs, looking in separate directions, to propagate an identity that lay outside the confines of a narrow independent nation, no longer part of the United Kingdom
Even in sport, the almost unimaginable consequences of Scotland going independent would be a mould changer.

http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news....u]


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
Forum » ..:: General ::.. » General Discussion » Scottish Independence, why it is being voted on
Page 1 of 11
Search: