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Forum » ..:: General ::.. » General Discussion » The Trojan Horse
The Trojan Horse
CulzieDate: Monday, 2011-03-21, 1:36 PM | Message # 16
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Thats the one RSAUB. Couldn't think of her name at all. Had been thinking about all the trouble she had got into for suggesting the Red Hand for the tailfin and yet anything Irish wouldn't have caused a ripple. That eejit of a professor from Glasgow was the main curplit.

It shows there is a big big job of work to do in getting the same respect for Ulster logos etc. It seems to me that when you say Irish its fine but Ulster is a different story. A lot of this comes from our own people who shy away from all things Ulster. That doesn't help. But on a brighter note I watched the boxing last night and the commentater on every ocassion referred to the guy from here as an Ulsterman.


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
RSAUBDate: Monday, 2011-03-21, 11:35 PM | Message # 17
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Aye the establishments assault on the word Ulster has been profound, we have a long hard battle in front of us, but our media celebrities and sport stars have to be at the forefront of this.. The likes of Kyle Lafferty running around Hampden with an Ulster flag wrapped around him and the two golfers standing posing with the Ulster flag are just two things that have happened within the past few months, so all is not lost.

The onslaught against Zoe Salmon was a disgrace, but she did at least attempt to defend herself and the professor was a foreigner at the University of Dundee I think?… The bottom line is we are the people of this nation and we have to hold our heads high and put our point across and if they can’t accept it, well stuff them, it’s our land.

 
CulzieDate: Tuesday, 2011-03-22, 10:15 PM | Message # 18
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Agreed. I knew about the golfers and the flag,but didn't know about Lafferty. Good to see it, though the rugby team seem to be moving in the opposite direction as its difficult to spot our Ulster flag now wheras before that was nearly all you seen. Wish more of our personalities would promote an Ulster identity. It does help.

Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
CulzieDate: Saturday, 2013-03-16, 6:06 PM | Message # 19
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The ancient 'Annals of  Ulster' record two significant events occurring one year apart :

In the year 431 from the Incarnation of the Lord,  Palladius,ordained by Celestinus,bishop of Rome,is sent,in the consulship of Etius and Valerius,into Ireland,first bishop to the Irish,that they may believe in Christ.''

''AD 432,  Patrick arrived in Ireland,in the reign of Theodosius the younger,in the first year of Xistus,the 42 bishop of the Church of Rome.'''

As far as I'm aware ,Palladius was recalled to Rome and Patrick was sent to replace him.

To the Irish,however, the main credit for the introduction of Christianity to Ireland belongs to St Patrick. Yet,despite Patrick's pre-eminent place in the history of the Irish church,we do not know just how much of his story his historical accurate. This uncertainty must be borne in mind when we come to look at his story.

After six years of servitude he managed to escape from Ireland,first going by boat to the Continent,then two years later returning to his parents in Britain. Tradition tells that Patrick eventually made the journey back to Ireland.

I have read that Patrick spent some time in France and that when he returned to Ireland it was as a bishop. So who ordained him as a bishop?

It seems to me amid all the controversry , claim and counter claim as to whether he was a Protestant or Roman Catholic
most evidence would suggest that he was sent to Ireland by the pope and thus he was Roman Catholic.


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
CulzieDate: Monday, 2013-03-18, 10:25 AM | Message # 20
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Unionists are slowly being sucked into the green bog. It would seem that at long last Protestants are following the route already  taken by the Anglo-Normans,the Anglo-English,the Vikings,Cromwell's soldiers etc.,who became more Irish than the Irish  themselves.

Our Protestantism helped to give us a separate identity and preserved us from being absorbed. However, with faith and our religion not having the same meaning to us as it did in times gone past,the way is open for those who seek to take us down the road to a united ireland. The next move will probably be Eire rejoining the Commonwealth,and this will have some unionists jumping up and down  with joy and not seeing beyond this...

It'll be a drop in the ocean admittedly among an estimated six million people around the world who'll be drowning their shamrocks over a weekend when only a minority of Ulster
Protestants will raise a glass to Patrick on what's seen by some as the Catholic answer to the Twelfth of July.

But things are changing. Slowly. And in the past decade a growing number of unionists have started to embrace the saint they once accused Sinn Fein of politicising for their own ends. Especially in Belfast.
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Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
CulzieDate: Sunday, 2013-03-24, 6:59 PM | Message # 21
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I'm one of the aul fashioned Prods 'Bushmills style'' lol. I have posted on Nelson's blog the following.
 
 
I'm not sure about all this veneration of Patrick or indeed any Saint.  Palladius is reckoned to have brought Christianity to Ireland before Patrick. Palladius was sent by the pope and its possible that Patrick too was sent by the pope.

I'm inclined to take the position described in The Protestant Revolution which said ..'the Reformation and its rejection of the Cult of Saints also meant the reinterpretation of Mary as the ideal 'Hausfrau' (housewife and mother) rather than as the Virgin Queen of Heaven.

We have no Saint Martin Luther,Saint John Knox or even a Saint King 'Billy'. ''the Reformation and its rejection of the Cult of Saints''. Yes I feel more at home with that.


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
RSAUBDate: Monday, 2013-03-25, 7:40 PM | Message # 22
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Very true, many loyalists are destroying their own Nation and people by promoting the Irishisation of our land. The fools, all we can do is stand against these vultures especially those who are being paid by the state to promote this crap and doing quite bluntly because of their own egos.
 
CulzieDate: Monday, 2013-03-25, 10:43 PM | Message # 23
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I think we must always be there to give an alternative to the hogwash which is being promoted by the lackeys and employees of the social engineers. A guy was on the NL site saying that the first paddy day parade was in America (where else would it be) and saying that Prods held it. Whether true or not I don't know. But he was asked when did the OO start parading for paddy's day....silence.
 
My own recollection is that is was after the BA was signed that they all started to come out of the woodwork. It all seems to have been planned and organized from above and the orders handed down. It didn't come across as a slow gradual process but was taken up very quickly by the herd. I don't mean just the OO but all the other organizations too. And don't forget McGrath was urging and promoting the irish card away back in the seventies. So it seems like they have followed what he preached back then,and he was said to be an agent of the government.
 
When you see what happened in Thorndyke St plus all the other things its easy to see a pattern emerge.
 
Not much we can do about it all except ''dare to be a Daniel'' and hope that not everyone is swayed by the social engineers (who know the love prods have for parades) as they push on with the irishisation of Ulster.


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
CulzieDate: Tuesday, 2014-02-04, 4:17 PM | Message # 24
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Came across this in a booklet titled 'Saint Patrick and his associations with Saul and Downpatrick' Page twenty three has

The great glory of Down is that it possessed the body of St Patrick, Jocelin writes:

'' The people of Ultonia, having entered Down, celebrated the solemnities of the Mass, and in the place foreshown by the heavenly light buried the venerable body with all due veneration; and this desirable treasure - this precious jewel - they deposited.....in the earth, lest haply by stealth, it might be conveyed hence.''

Then on page twenty-seven it has

''From the fifth to the eighth century Ireland became one of the great centres of Christianity in the world, and not only of Christian holiness and virtue but also of knowledge, literature, and that intellectual life with which the new faith was about to endow Europe.'' ''Durrow and Armagh became the universities of the West.''

FROM AN 8TH CENTURY CATALOGUE OF THE SAINTS OF IRELAND

''The first order of Catholic saints was in the time of Patrick; and then they were all bishops, distinguished and holy, and full of the Holy Ghost, 350 in number, founders of churches. They had one Mass, one liturgy , one tonsure from ear to ear.

So they were celebrating the Mass.


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
CulzieDate: Friday, 2015-04-10, 9:15 PM | Message # 25
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A bit of a debate going on about Patrick and this was one of the posts.

If you are asking whether Patrick was a pre-Lutheran 'Protestant' the answer has to be no. Patrick never engaged in any doctrinal controversy and, as I pointed out to you already, in terms of his religious profession he explicitly identified himself with the 'holy Romans' in the following statement from his Epistola:

'... non dico civibus meis neque civibus sanctorum Romanorum ...'.
(... I do not say [this]to my fellow-citizens nor to fellow-citizens of the holy Romans ...) 

A reading of it makes clear that Patrick was obviously Catholic because his writings demonstrate his belief in episcopacy, ministerial priesthood, confirmation, the value of monks and nuns, purgatory, priestly absolution, and penance, all of which are very obviously Catholic.

I would argue strongly that anyone who 'believes' Patrick was a 'Protestant' has not read what Patrick wrote himself. It is obvious from reading his Confessio and his Epistola that he was a Catholic of his time. Both of these works can be consulted at the following links:

Confessio: Confession | St. Patrick?s Confessio

Epistola: Letter to the soldiers of Coroticus | St. Patrick?s Confessio

You should recommend them as essential reading for those who claim Patrick was a 'Protestant'.


Ulster Protestants consider themselves to be a separate nation. This nation they call Ulster
 
RSAUBDate: Monday, 2018-05-07, 6:39 PM | Message # 26
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Well said, there's no point our people deluding themselves. The evidence seems to clearly show that Patrick was indeed a Catholic.
 
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